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Low Country Down Syndrome Society Archives - Carriage Trade PR

LDSS Held Chatham County Camp Buddy 2016

By | Local NewsWIRE, Savannah, Georgia Public Relations Firm, PR Agency, Uncategorized

(CHATHAM CO.) The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) hosted their eighth annual Camp Buddy summer camp in Chatham County. The goal of Camp Buddy is to promote retention of information by offering programs to prepare children for the upcoming school year.

Special education, occupational, physical and speech therapists designed a customized curriculum to help children retain information they learned during the previous school year.

“Many children have benefited from the camp and excelled in many areas,” said Savannah Camp Buddy director Pam Hussey “Camp Buddy will help them face their challenges and continue to succeed.”

This year’s camp activities included music, dance, arts and crafts, as well as bike, trike and scooter board riding. After camp, each camper was sent home with an individualized therapy plan and a medal.

Information on CHATHAM Camp Buddy:
Camp Buddy Chatham included 2 weeks this year:
The first week: Monday, July 11, Wednesday, July 13, Friday, July 15.
The second week: Monday, July 18, Wednesday, July 20, Friday, July 22.

Camp Buddy Chatham was for children of all ages with Down syndrome. For children ages three to five, Camp Buddy Chatham ran from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. For middle-school-aged children, Camp Buddy Chatham ran from 9 a.m to 12:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. For elementary-school-aged children, Camp Buddy Chatham ran from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

For more information about Chatham Camp Buddy, contact Pam Hussey at (912) 220-6429 or pbjhussey@gmail.com.

Camp Buddy was sponsored by the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society and was made possible through the generosity of the community, friends and family of LDSS and events like the Buddy Walk and Night of Champions. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Vinny Anderson, Kristen Horton, Lori Horton and Wyatt Divine play during the Lowcountry Down Syndrome’s society Camp Buddy Chatham.

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Vinny Anderson, Kristen Horton, Lori Horton and Wyatt Divine play during the Lowcountry Down Syndrome’s society Camp Buddy Chatham.

Whitley Divine getting excited to play field hockey with the rest of the campers%2C the Camp Buddy incorporates a different Olympic sport each day

Whitley Divine getting excited to play field hockey with the rest of the campers%2C the Camp Buddy incorporates a different Olympic sport each day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE LOWCOUNTRY DOWN SYNDROME SOCIETY
The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) is a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through local leadership, outreach, education, and advocacy to champion and celebrate acceptance and inclusion. Meetings are held every 4th Tuesday of the month, typically with a guest speaker and social time for families to meet and interact with one another. LDSS encourages people to bring their children. LDSS is an affiliate of the National Down Syndrome Society. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

CONTACT

Candy Bogardus
Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society
912-728-8505
jcbogardus@gmail.com

MEDIA CONTACT
Marjorie Young
CarriageTrade PR
912-844-9990
marjorie@carriagetradepr.com
www.carriagetradepr.com

LDSS Announces Plans For Effingham and Chatham County Camp Buddy 2016

By | Local NewsWIRE, Savannah, Georgia Public Relations Firm, PR Agency

(EFFINGHAM CO. / CHATHAM CO.) The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) is hosting their eighth annual Camp Buddy summer camp in Effingham and Chatham Counties. The goal of Camp Buddy is to promote retention of information by offering programs to prepare children for the upcoming school year.

Special education, occupational, physical and speech therapists have designed a customized curriculum to help children retain information they learned during the previous school year.

“Many children have benefited from the camp and excelled in many areas,” said Savannah Camp Buddy director Pam Hussey “Camp Buddy will help them face their challenges and continue to succeed.”

This year’s camp activities include music, dance, arts and crafts, as well as bike, trike and scooter board riding. After camp, each camper is sent home with an individualized therapy plan and a medal.

“It is so amazing to watch our children grow and learn” said Molly Marchese, Camp Buddy Effingham Director.

Registration for Camp Buddy is $400 per child for the entire week. This cost includes therapy sessions, entertainment, camp t-shirt and snacks.

Information on EFFINGHAM Camp Buddy:
Camp Buddy Effingham will run from June 27- July 1, 2016.

Camp Buddy Effingham is for children of all ages with Down syndrome.
For children ages 3-6, Camp Buddy Effingham runs from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. For children ages 7 and older, Camp Buddy Effingham runs from 11:30 a.m to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Send your registration form by email or mail to:
Molly Marchese,
Director of Camp Buddy Effingham
571 Stillwell -Clyo Rd.
Springfield, GA 31329

Information on CHATHAM Camp Buddy:
Camp Buddy Chatham will include 2 weeks this year:
The first week will be: Monday, July 11, Wednesday, July 13, Friday, July 15.
The second week will be: Monday, July 18, Wednesday, July 20, Friday, July 22.

Camp Buddy Chatham is also for children of all ages with Down syndrome. For children ages three to five, Camp Buddy Chatham runs from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. For middle-school-aged children, Camp Buddy Chatham runs from 9 a.m to 12:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. For elementary-school-aged children, Camp Buddy Chatham runs from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Camp Buddy Chatham forms are due June 10.
Send your registration form by email or mail to:
Pam Hussey
Director of Camp Buddy Chatham
7424 Hemlock Ave.
Savannah, GA 31406.

According to Hussey, the Camp is always looking for teen volunteers, 15 years or older, to work with the children. For more information about attending or volunteering for Effingham Camp Buddy contact Molly Marchese at 
(912)754-4437, (912)213-9127, or mollymarchese@windstream.net
. For more information about attending or volunteering for Chatham Camp Buddy contact Pam Hussey, Director of Camp Buddy Chatham
 at (912) 220-6429 or pbjhussey@gmail.com.

Camp Buddy is sponsored by the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society and is made possible through the generosity of the community, friends and family of LDSS and events like the Buddy Walk and Night of Champions. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

Aidan Burnett pictured from the 2015 Camp Buddy

Aidan Burnett pictured from the 2015 Camp Buddy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE LOWCOUNTRY DOWN SYNDROME SOCIETY
The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) is a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through local leadership, outreach, education, and advocacy to champion and celebrate acceptance and inclusion. Meetings are held every 4th Tuesday of the month, typically with a guest speaker and social time for families to meet and interact with one another. LDSS encourages people to bring their children. LDSS is an affiliate of the National Down Syndrome Society. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

CONTACT
Candy Bogardus
Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society
912-728-8505
jcbogardus@gmail.com

MEDIA CONTACT
Marjorie Young
CarriageTrade PR
912-844-9990
marjorie@carriagetradepr.com
www.carriagetradepr.com

Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society Recognizes Area Employees with Down Syndrome and Their Employers at Annual Night of Champions Gala

By | Local NewsWIRE, Savannah, Georgia Public Relations Firm, PR Agency

(SAVANNAH, GA) The seventh annual Night of Champions was held at the Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa – Hotel Grand Ballroom, and was emceed by celebrity chef Jamie Deen. This community event celebrated differently-abled adults, including those with Down syndrome, and recognized the local businesses that employ these individuals. Lead Actor of Where Hope Grows, David DeSanctis, who has Down syndrome, was a guest speaker during the gala.

This year, the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) honored the following individuals and businesses as the 2016 Champions: Willie Baker, Port Wentworth Police & Fire; Charles Brown, St. Joseph’s/Candler; Lee Brown, Five Guys – Pooler; Ryan Peck, Publix – Bluffton; Monique Shields, Zaxby’s; Frank Williams III, Goodwill. The President’s Award was presented to Jay Thompson of Xcel Strategies.

According to the National Down Syndrome Congress, as many as eighty percent of adults with Down syndrome are unemployed. LDSS hopes through this annual event and their ongoing awareness campaign, that they can lessen this statistic and increase the level of understanding required to recognize the skills and contributions present in these individuals.

For more information on LDSS’ annual Night of Champions, visit http://nightofchampions.org.

 (LEFT TO RIGHT) Willie Baker, Lee Brown, Ryan Peck, Monique Shields, Charles Brown, Frank Williams III, named this year’s Champions at the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society’s Night of Champions gala at the Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa.

(LEFT TO RIGHT) Willie Baker, Lee Brown, Ryan Peck, Monique Shields, Charles Brown, Frank Williams III, named this year’s Champions at the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society’s Night of Champions gala at the Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa.

 

ABOUT THE LOWCOUNTRY DOWN SYNDROME SOCIETY
The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) is a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through local leadership, outreach, education, and advocacy to champion and celebrate acceptance and inclusion. Meetings are held every 4th Tuesday of the month, typically with a guest speaker and social time for families to meet and interact with one another. LDSS encourages people to bring their children. LDSS is an affiliate of the National Down Syndrome Society. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

CONTACT
Candy Bogardus
Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society
912-728-8505
jcbogardus@gmail.com

MEDIA CONTACT
Marjorie Young
CarriageTrade PR
912-844-9990
marjorie@carriagetradepr.com
www.carriagetradepr.com

Joy Prom to be Held at Savannah’s Alee Temple April 22

By | Local NewsWIRE, Savannah, Georgia Public Relations Firm, PR Agency

(SAVANNAH, GA) Xcel Strategies, Inc. announces that the 7th annual Joy Prom will be held on Friday, April 22 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Alee Temple, located at 100 Eisenhower Drive. Joy Prom is designed to celebrate life with purpose and offer differently-abled adults an enchanted experience by providing a night of dancing, food, friendship, and fun. This year’s theme is “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” which was inspired by Wizard of Oz.

Prom participants must be 16 years or older, and will receive prom flowers, photos, t-shirts and souvenir bags in addition to an evening filled with dancing, dinner and cake.
After entering on the red carpet, they will be escorted to a volunteer to assist them with make-up for the ladies, and shoe shining for the men. Throughout the night, they will be able to show off their boutonnieres and corsages while competing for King and Queen.

Chick-fil-A will provide dinner while the guests listen to the live music of The Fabulous Equinox Orchestra.

Xcel Strategies, Inc. is a nonprofit organization in Savannah that mentors young men and encourages them to work toward their dreams. The mentoring network aims to create a bold and courageous generation to combat the problem of fatherlessness in the community.
The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society, a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families, has partnered with Xcel Strategies to help with decorations and volunteers for this event.

Other partners include: Coastal Center for Developmental Services, AMBUCS of Savannah, and Abilities Unlimited. The event also has several sponsors such as: Chick-fil-A, Dan Vaden Chevrolet, Goodwill of Savannah, Exchange Club of Savannah, Savannah Tech, Tapestry Church, Katie McGee Photography and Marie Kay Cosmetics.

Tickets are free and open to the public for anyone 16 years and older. For more information, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/joy-prom-2016-over-the-rainbow-tickets-22083961724

 

Joy Prom

Joy Prom Flier

ABOUT THE LOWCOUNTRY DOWN SYNDROME SOCIETY
The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) is a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through local leadership, outreach, education, and advocacy to champion and celebrate acceptance and inclusion. Meetings are held every 4th Tuesday of the month, typically with a guest speaker and social time for families to meet and interact with one another. LDSS encourages people to bring their children. LDSS is an affiliate of the National Down Syndrome Society. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

CONTACT
Candy Bogardus
Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society
912-728-8505
jcbogardus@gmail.com

MEDIA CONTACT
Marjorie Young
CarriageTrade PR
912-844-9990
marjorie@carriagetradepr.com
www.carriagetradepr.com

Firefighters Select Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society As Benefiting Charity for Annual Poker Run

By | Local NewsWIRE, Savannah, Georgia Public Relations Firm, PR Agency

(SAVANNAH, GA) The local chapter of the Red Knights International Firefighters Motorcycle Club announces that their annual Poker Run will be held Sunday, April 24 and will benefit the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS). Registration for the 2.5 hour motorcycle run will begin at 9:30 a.m. at Southern Biker Gear in Richmond Hill. Proceeds collected from the event will directly support LDSS.

LDSS is a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through a variety of efforts. The Poker Run specifically benefits Camp Buddy, The Night of Champions, and the annual Buddy Walk.

“We greatly appreciate the firefighters selecting the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society as the organization to benefit from this year’s event,” said Candy Bogardus, LDSS president. “We are always looking for ways to promote acceptance and inclusion of people with Down syndrome.”

In addition, a family-friendly event is set to celebrate the end of the run at Savannah Harley Davidson, 1 Fort Argyle Road in Savannah, to include interactive games, a silent auction, door prizes, food, and live entertainment from Jacob Boswell, Taylor Cook and Greg Park.

For more information about the Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society, visit http://www.ldssga.org/. For more information on the Red Knights International Firefighters Motorcycle Club of Savannah, visit http://redknights15.com/index.htm.

MORE ABOUT THE LOWCOUNTRY DOWN SYNDROME SOCIETY
The Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society (LDSS) is a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through local leadership, outreach, education, and advocacy to champion and celebrate acceptance and inclusion. Meetings are held every 4th Tuesday of the month, typically with a guest speaker and social time for families to meet and interact with one another. LDSS encourages people to bring their children. LDSS is an affiliate of the National Down Syndrome Society. For more information about LDSS, visit http://www.ldssga.org/

CONTACT
Candy Bogardus
jcbogardus@gmail.com
912-663-8573

MEDIA CONTACT
Cynthia Wright
Carriage Trade PR
cynthia.wright@carriagetradepr.com
912.856.9075

10 Things to Consider With Down Syndrome By Candy Bogardus

By | Local NewsWIRE, Savannah, Georgia Public Relations Firm, PR Agency

What do you see when you walk by someone on the street with Down syndrome? Do you notice their distinctive stride or smile? Do the differences in their appearance stick out in your mind or catch your attention?

Having a child with Down syndrome qualifies me as an expert in most people’s minds, and I get asked quite often, “How should I treat your daughter?” or “What is the appropriate way to act towards people with Down syndrome?” The most obvious but completely right answer to those questions is, “The same way you treat everybody else.”

Down syndrome is a genetic condition resulting from an extra copy of the twenty-first chromosome. It is actually the most common genetic condition, occurring in one out of every 691 babies in the United States annually. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome.

There are many misconceptions floating around about Down syndrome, people with Down syndrome and their families. Here are my top ten facts about Down syndrome that most people don’t know:

1. Down syndrome doesn’t define a person.

Down syndrome is simply one small part of who someone is. Having Down syndrome doesn’t prevent anyone from going after their dreams. As people aren’t judged for the color of their skin, we shouldn’t judge people by their different abilities.

2. People with Down syndrome have successful careers.

There is nothing holding those with Down syndrome back from succeeding. Researchers have found that those with Down syndrome have a high adaptive skill. This allows them to succeed in their day-to-day living and work skills. Each and every person has potential, especially those with Down syndrome. After all, they are born with a little extra.

3. Having Down syndrome does not make you less special.

With a little bit of patience, you will discover that those with Down syndrome have different personalities, interests, and hobbies. Dispositions range from loud to quiet, bubbly to serious, and outgoing to shy. Never assume an adult or child with Down syndrome is always cheerful, but get to know their true identity and temperament.

4. It’s ok to ask for someone to slow down or repeat themselves.

Low muscle tone is common among those with Down syndrome, and can affect their speech patterns, making them difficult to understand. Learning to communicate with someone who speaks differently can be a difficult task; asking for clarification shows that you are trying to learn. Just remember to be extra-attentive.

5. Being born with Down syndrome does not make you a failure.

With proper education, a loving support system, and dedicated teachers, those with Down syndrome do lead happy lives. Across the country, there are dozens of cases where adults have graduated from college and owned and operated businesses. Some have become distinguished artists, and some have even led successful social movements.

In a survey of 284 people with Down syndrome, 99 percent say that they were happy with their lives. If that is not success, I’m not sure what is.

6. People with Down syndrome simply need a little more time.

They don’t need you to do everything. In most cases, they’re able to do the same things you can, just at their own pace. They want to be able to do things by themselves, and if they do need help, they’ll ask.

7. They’re able to live alone.

Some adults do prefer to stay at home with family, but others enjoy the freedom of living alone. It’s an individual decision that varies from person to person. There’s no reason to assume that those with Down syndrome will need assistance forever; they just need a little more at the beginning.

8. Down syndrome is not contagious in ANY way.

Down syndrome, the genetic addition of an extra chromosome, can manifest itself in many different ways depending on the person; however, this is something the person is born with and is not passed on to others.

9. Having a child born with Down syndrome is a GIFT and a BLESSING, not a tragedy.

We all have our own take on life that’s created by the challenges we overcome. Those with Down syndrome have their own perspective, which often times, is unique and beautiful. This perspective has a quantifiable aspect as well.

Researchers from the Kennedy Research Center found that the divorce rate in families with a child with Down syndrome was 10.8 percent lower than in those without a differently-abled child. In another study, 88 percent of siblings reported feeling that they themselves were better people for having a younger sibling with Down syndrome. It is honestly a blessing to have a person with Down syndrome in your life.

10. Watch how your reference…
It is “Down syndrome” – not “Downs Syndrome.” If you must refer to a condition, use neutral language. Avoid using the following terms: “disability,” “afflicted with,” “stricken with,” “suffers from,” “victim of,” “defect,” “defective,” “special,” or “special needs.”

Appropriate words to use: “intellectually and developmentally challenged,” “cognitively challenged,” or “differently-abled.” Don’t make conditions sound like a disease and never refer to a condition as an illness. Also, it is important to remember to refer to the child or adult as ” a child or adult with Down syndrome”. After all, they are people first.

Each and every person with Down syndrome is unique… Just like every other person in your community. They may just need the opportunity to show you who they really are. A few extra seconds can create a beautiful and lasting friendship.

So the next time you see someone with Down syndrome, take your time and get to know them, allow them into your life just as you would anyone else. I promise you won’t regret it, and you will be a better person because of them.

Candy Bogardus is a founder of Lowcountry Down Syndrome Society, a family support group to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through local leadership, outreach, education, and advocacy to champion and celebrate acceptance and inclusion. Bogardus can be reached at jcbogardus@gmail.com or 912-663-8573

Candy Bogardus

Candy Bogardus